By Billy Hammond (Copyright AELS)

Public water didn’t become available in some areas until the 1960s and even then, the remote areas still weren’t served by a water line. Most families relied on catchment rain water collected in wooden tanks built on stilts, which was probably to help them survive Hawaii’s earthquakes. Some of the water was used for flush toilets but in general, most houses had dry toilets located a short distance from the main home, often with a fig tree planted near it (which is often the case in the country in Japan as well).

 

Even the elementary school I went to had a row of dry toilets located above the school, although the kindergarten had a flush toilet. This changed during my elementary school years when the school got hooked up to County water.

 

The old dry toilets were a shed built over a deep hole in the ground, which tended to be mostly rock in Kona. A raised wooden seat with a hole (or quite often two or more holes, so more than one person could use it at a time) was set in the toilet usually connected to the back wall of the shed. Wooden covers were placed over each hole to keep the flies from breeding in the waste below, which often didn’t seem to make much difference since there always seemed to be blowflies and regular house flies near them.

 

Since the dry toilets were located a distance from the living quarters, using them at night required a kerosene lantern or flashlight to get to them without breaking your neck. Of course, since you used the same path day in and day out, you could probably have reached them blindfolded if you needed to.

 

In my day, bathroom tissue was widespread and most dry toilets were stocked with it, but it wasn’t unusual for an old mail-order catalog to be left there for “emergency use”. In those cases, you’d sit on the toilet and crinkle up the paper over and over again to get it soft enough to use.

 

Of course, they all smelled like you-know-what, but it was just one of those smells of daily living that everyone put up with, just like the rotting coffee skins spread out under the coffee trees after husking the coffee.

 

約半世紀前にコナに野外ポットン便所!?

 

コナの殆どの地域には1960年代まで水道はなかった。住民は大型木製樽のようなタンクで雨水を溜めていた。そのタンクは通常地震対策として強化した柱上に建てられた。溜めた水は家やビル内の水洗トイレに利用されることもあったが、殆どの家には野外便所があった。干ばつ中、限れた雨水を節約するため、野外便所の使用が主となった。不思議なことで、なぜか野外便所近くにはよくイチジクの木が植えられていた。

 

通っていた小学校にも学校の山側には野外便所が並んでいた。幼稚園だけには雨水の水洗トイレが設置されていた。小学校12年頃に学校がハワイ島水道局の水道管に接続、やっと水洗トイレに切り替わった。

 

コナの野外便所は岩盤に掘った深い穴の上に建てられた。木製の座る台には穴があり、通常、便所の後ろ壁に固定された。殆どの台には穴が2つ以上あり、5つのも見た覚えがある。ハエの繁殖を防ぐため、木製の蓋も用意されていたが、どの野外便所にハエがいたので大した効果はなかった。

 

野外トイレは住まいから少し離れていたため、夜の使用には石油ランタンまたは懐中電灯は必要だった。しかし、毎日歩く道だったのできっと誰でも目隠しても歩けたに違いない。

 

日本と異なって、汲取り式ではなかったので、満杯が近づくと穴を埋めて、別場所で新に建てる仕組みだった。

 

幸いに私の子供の頃にはトイレットペーパーが主流になっていたが、母の時代には新聞紙や古雑誌などを使われたようだ。それにしても、どの野外便所にも『緊急用』の通信販売のカタログや雑誌が置かれていた。

 

もちろん、野外便所の匂いはひどかったが、当時のコーヒー木の下に撒かれた腐敗するコーヒー皮肥料と同じく、日常生活の匂いとして我慢した。

By Billy Hammond (Copyright A.E.L.S)

*************

Books published by AELS (AELS出版書籍)

魔女学院&光塾:魔女ガールズの冒険

原作&翻訳:ビレー ハモンド

日本語編集:伊庭野れい子

Majoh Gakuin & Hikari Juku – Japanese Witch Schools – English Edition (魔女学院&光塾(英語)

By Billy Hammond

迷える魔女の戦い (魔女学院&光塾シリーズ第2)

原作&翻訳:ビレー ハモンド

日本語編集:伊庭野れい子

Lost Witch (Majoh Gakuin & Hikari Juku Series Book 2) – English Edition (迷える魔女: 魔女学院&光塾第2弾:英語版)

By Billy Hammond

幸せを運ぶ魔法のチャレンジ 魔女学院&光塾シリーズの第3(Fate & Magic Jp)

原作&翻訳:ビレー ハモンド

日本語編集:伊庭野れい子

“Fate & Magic” Majoh Gakuin & Hikari Juku Series – Japanese Witch Schools Book 3 – English Edition (幸せを運ぶ魔法のチャレンジの英語版)

By Billy Hammond

Regressed 「過去に生きて・・・」

原作&翻訳:ビレー ハモンド

日本語編集:伊庭野れい子

Regressed – English Edition

By Billy Hammond

*************